Lasqueti Island: a Unique and Distinctive Destination

If the pace and pressures of modern life are not to your liking, or if you just want to experience a lifestyle that works in complete harmony with Nature, then Lasqueti Island might be the ideal place for you.

Administered by the Islands Trust, which was created by the Province of British Columbia in 1974 to preserve the special nature of the islands in the southern Strait of Georgia and Howe Sound, Lasqueti Island is known for the laid back and low impact focus of its residents. In many ways a trip to Lasqueti is like a journey back in time, as the only regular sea-link to the island is by a passenger-only ferry – no cars are carried by the Centurion VII, a 70 gross ton, 60 passenger vessel constructed in 1985.

Operated by Western Pacific Marine under contract from BC Ferries, the Centurion VII runs from its terminal at French Creek Harbour (just north of Parksville) to False Bay on Lasqueti Island where visitors will find the Island’s only hotel, pub and restaurant. Pay parking for cars is available at the French Creek marina, with the trip taking up to an hour to complete, depending on the state of the sea.

Approximately 19 kilometers (12 miles) long and nearly five kilometers (three miles) wide, Lasqueti Island covers an area of 6,645 hectares (16,420 acres). This area increases to 7,358 hectares when the more than 20 other neighboring islands are factored into its dimensions, the largest of which include nearby Jedediah, Jenkins, and Sangster Islands.

The island received its Spanish-themed name in 1791, thanks to the explorations of the region that nation was carrying out at the time. A Spanish Naval officer, José María Narváez, who at the time was serving as the commander of the 42 foot schooner Santa Saturnina, was the first European to reach the island. He named his new discovery after Juan Maria Lasqueti who was a well-known Spanish naval officer.

The term “off the grid” definitely describes life on Lasqueti Island. The island lacks paved roads, has no public transportation and is not serviced by BC Hydro. The island’s nearly 400 residents (according to the 2016 Census) have elected to either live without electricity at all, or have invested in alternate power sources, primarily generators, solar power or in some cases micro-hydro. The Lasqueti Island Hotel for example shuts off its generator at 11:30 each evening, allowing its guests to better enjoy the peace and serenity the island is famous for.

The residents in many cases live a quiet ‘back to the land’ type of lifestyle, as there is little in the way of industry or business on the island. Small scale subsistence farming provides for much of their needs, with trips to Vancouver Island looking after the rest. Get away cabins, and retirees seeking a slower pace make up much of the remaining full time population. The resident population had actually dropped by four percent between the 2011 and 2016 Census, as people moved on to other adventures.

For somewhere different, for a region operating at a slower more Natural pace, there are few destinations more idyllic than Lasqueti Island. Why not check it out for yourself?

December Housing Sales Up 40 Percent From 2018

Island home buyers were active right up until the end of the year, according to the latest information released by the Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB). Single family home sales across Vancouver Island were up a full 40 percent during December when compared to the same month last year.

The VIREB report stated that 237 single family homes were sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System last month. During December 2018 only 169 single family homes traded hands. The December sales figures were actually down 24 percent when compared to November, when 312 single family homes were reported sold.

An interesting fact revealed by the VIREB report is how buyer preferences have changed from a year ago. While single family home sales climbed markedly, apartment sales spiked even more, with 68 percent more homes of this type selling last month when compared to a year ago. Interestingly enough 20 percent fewer townhomes were sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System during December than were reported sold in 2018.

Despite a flurry of activity during December the year-end sales stats show that nine percent fewer homes were sold within the VIREB coverage area during 2019 than were sold in the previous year. VIREB reports on real estate activity occurring from the northern end of Vancouver Island to the north end of the Malahat in the south. During 2019 a total of 4,119 homes were reported as sold. During 2018 there were 4,539 completed sales.

The inventory of available properties across Vancouver Island last month was nearly identical to what was available during December 2018. Last month there were 937 properties of all types on the market, while in the previous December there were 934 homes on the block. The December totals were actually down 19 percent from the inventory available during November.

The number of apartments available for sale last month climbed 10 percent year over year, from 270 to 298, with the inventory of townhouses plunging a full 35 percent year over year. During December there were only 96 properties of this type available for sale across Vancouver Island. Last year at this time there were 148 townhouses on the market.

The Vancouver Island Real Estate Board uses benchmark pricing to track the value of typical homes in each of its individual zones. During December the board-wide benchmark price of a single family home had climbed five percent from the previous year to end the month at $518,000. This was slightly higher than the board-wide price reported in November.

VIREB reported price increases in all available housing types. In the apartment category for example the year over year benchmark price had climbed by four percent to $304,600, while the board-wide benchmark price of townhouses had edged up two percent to $408,500.

Price increases were reported in all of VIREB’s individual zones last month. In Nanaimo the December benchmark price of a single family home climbed four percent from a year ago to reach $562,000. In the Parksville / Qualicum Beach area the benchmark price was up one percent to $583,400 while in the Cowichan Valley the benchmark price year over year was up six percent to $484,700.

Further north in the Comox Valley, the benchmark price of a single family home was up four percent from December 2018, closing the year at $528,600. In Campbell River the benchmark price was up two percent from a year ago, reaching $423,900, while in the Alberni Valley the year-end benchmark price of a single family home was up nine percent to $324,500.

In a marketplace as complex and dynamic as Vancouver Island’s it’s more important than ever to have the skills and experience of a professional REALTOR® on your side when buying or selling a home. Call Peter and Kathy today to ensure you have the information you need when it comes time to buy or sell.

Island Home Sales Edge Upward As Prices Rise

The public’s appetite for single family homes is on the rise on Vancouver Island, according to the latest information released by the Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB). In its latest statistical report VIREB stated that 312 single family homes traded hands last month, an increase of three percent when compared to the same month last year.

Interestingly enough that figure is actually down nine percent from the number of homes reported sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System during October, when 343 properties were reported sold. The spike in sales was restricted solely to single family homes however, as apartment and townhouse sales declined last month (eight and 33 percent respectively) when compared to November 2018.

During November a total of 65 apartments and 26 townhouses were reported sold within the VIREB coverage area, which extends from the northern tip of Vancouver Island to the Malahat in the south.

The Real Estate Board also reported that the number of homes currently on the market continued to rise last month when compared to a year ago.

During November 1,155 single family homes were listed on the MLS® System, up eight percent from last year when 1,065 single family homes were on the block. The swelling housing inventory also saw 15 percent more apartments being listed for sale last month when compared to November 2018 – 368 versus the 319 reported on the market last year.

The number of townhomes on the market actually dropped significantly from a year ago, with only 123 listed for sale in November, as compared to the 177 on the MLS® System last year. This drop represents a 31 percent decline in available properties of this type.

Housing prices across Vancouver Island continued to edge upward during November, despite an increase in the number of properties listed for sale. VIREB uses benchmark pricing to track the value of typical homes in each of its individual areas. The board-wide benchmark price of a single family home climbed three percent to $517,100 during November. This month-end price is actually down from October’s benchmark price of $521,800.

Year-over-year incremental price increases were also reported in the apartment and townhouse categories. Last month the board-wide benchmark price of an apartment was up three percent to $297,000, with the townhouse benchmark price edging up two percent to $405,700. In both cases these prices were slightly lower than those reported during October.

Single family home price increases were reported in each of VIREB’s individual zones last month. In Nanaimo for example the benchmark price showed a marginal increase of less than one percent to end the month at $558,400. In the Parksville / Qualicum Beach area the benchmark price rose two percent to $576,500, while in the Cowichan Valley the benchmark price climbed an identical two percent to $479,500.

In the Comox Valley the benchmark price of a single family home climbed a full five percent from a year ago to $530,200. Further north in Campbell River the benchmark price also climbed five percent to $440,200, while in the Alberni Valley the benchmark price of a single family home hit $329,000, a six percent price increase over the same month last year.

In Vancouver Island’s dynamic Buyer’s Market it’s more important than ever to have sales professionals like Peter and Kathy Koch on your side. Call them today if you’re interested in buying or selling a home.

Overview: Vancouver Island Regional Library

The American novelist Norman Cousins is credited with saying: “A library is the delivery room for the birth of ideas, a place where history comes to life.” If that’s the case than Vancouver Island should be fountain from which a wealth of ideas spring – thanks to the efforts of the Vancouver Island Regional Library (VIRL) system.

Ranked as the fourth largest library system in the province, the VIRL serves clients all across Vancouver Island (with the exception of the Greater Victoria area) as well as the town of Bella Coola on the central coast and the island communities of Haida Gwaii. In total the regional library system serves a population of more than 430,000 via its 39 individual library branches and its innovative eLibrary and ‘books by mail’ services.

Headquartered in Nanaimo, the Vancouver Island Regional Library first opened its doors to the eager minds of the region in 1936 and at the time was only the second regional library system of its type in North America. Presently the VIRL operates with budget of more than $20 million and during 2018 saw nearly 3 million visitors enter its various branches, individuals who checked out nearly five million separate items.

But a modern library is much more than a collection of books and magazines – in many ways the online world has enhanced rather than detracted from the value of the local library. Operating more than 220 computer systems within its various branches the VIRL’s users participated in more than 53,000 WiFi sessions last year, while more than 140,000 people took part in the 5,800 individual programs offered by the library system.

This is a far cry from the early days of the VIRL. When it first opened its doors, the entity that would eventually blossom into today’s regional library operated from six branches, structures that housed fewer than 13,000 books. The fledgling library operated with a budget of less than $9,000 to serve a total membership of just over 6,000 persons.

An interesting bit of demographic data is that presently 83 percent of the VIRL’s members are adults, with only 17 percent of its membership being children – a statistic the regional library would like to change. To appeal to a younger audience, and to instill the joy of reading in the region’s youngest citizens, the VIRL operates many programs specifically geared toward the younger set. These include special story reading sessions, enhanced online tools and even helping to construct a local skate park on Gabriola Island.

While having grown and evolved over the decades to better serve the changing needs of its audience, the Vancouver Island Regional Library continues to plan for the future, having renovated many of its branches in recent years and having willing embraced the latest in digital delivery systems to make the library experience exciting and appealing for members of all ages.

Tips for Preparing Your Home for a Showing

You’ve decided to sell your home, you’ve contacted your favorite REALTOR®, and you’ve begun the process of putting your property on the market. Those are important first steps. But to attract the right sort of buyers and to ultimately receive the sort of return on your housing investment you’d like, it’s important to make your home as appealing and as attractive as possible.

It’s a corny old saying, but it’s still true that you never have a second chance to make a good first impression. For a home seller that first impression starts with what’s typically referred to as ‘curb appeal’ – or how the home looks when you first see it from the road. For many potential buyers that first glimpse could be the difference between a profitable sale and a home left hanging on the market for an extended period.

A buyer will never know how gorgeous your home is on the inside if the exterior of the property is a turn off for them. Depending on the season always ensure the lawn is freshly cut, the autumn leaves are carefully raked, or if it’s in the winter that the driveway is shoveled and snow-free. Few things can dissuade a buyer more than having to trudge through snow or wet slush to get to the front door of a home.

Regardless of the season it’s vitally important to remove any unsightly clutter, both inside and outside of the property before showing a home. Debris, tools, toys, derelict vehicles and improperly stored trash can do more to lower a home’s eventual sale price than just about anything. The same can be said for pets. While you may love your dog or cat not everyone does so it’s a good idea to keep any pets out of sight during a showing – and to quickly pick up after them should they have an accident.

Clutter inside a house is probably the first thing a prospective buyer will notice upon entering the home. Always pick up and put away anything that doesn’t need to be there – especially on stairs, tables or behind furniture. A pile of shoes by the doorway, or a clump of newspapers and mail dumped on a table can give buyers a negative impression of the property.

For many the kitchen is the most important room in the home. When showing your property always ensure the kitchen is clean, odor-free and pleasant. Any potential buyer is going to be turned-off if they step on something sticky that was spilled earlier but not cleaned up. In addition a refrigerator covered in magnets, children’s artwork and other personal items might be fine for you but could be a real buzz-kill for a potential buyer. Always strive to present you home in the best possible light.

The same is true in the bathroom, which must be uncluttered, dry and without any unpleasant smells. It’s also a good idea to have clean fresh towels on the rack, and that personal toiletry items must be put away prior to any visitor stopping by.

The list could go on and on but you get the idea. You want your home to sell quickly and for the most money possible. By taking a few steps before a showing your property will appeal to a wider audience and ultimately sell for a higher price. It’s your biggest investment, so make the effort to get the full return you’re entitled to.

Island Housing Sales Dip While Prices Rise

Housing sales in all categories dropped last month when compared to a year ago, according to the latest report from the Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB). During October a total of 343 single family homes were sold on Vancouver Island, a dip of 11 percent from the same month last year when 384 homes were sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System. This figure is nearly identical to the number that changed hands in September.

Sales were not any better in the apartment and townhouse categories either, as this segment of the housing market also reported a decline, by nine and 22 percent respectively. During October 88 apartments were sold on the MLS® System, while a total of 42 townhomes were sold within VIREB’s coverage area, which extends from the Malahat to the northern tip of Vancouver Island.

While housing sales are showing a decline, the number of properties being placed on the market is on the rise. VIREB’s stats show that the Vancouver Island housing inventory climbed 14 percent last month when compared to October 2018. A year ago there were 1,173 single family homes for sale, last month that number had risen to 1,333.

The number of apartments and townhomes for sale are also increasing. Last month there were 373 apartments on the block, an increase of 16 percent from a year ago when 322 apartments were listed for sale. The townhouse category recorded an even larger increase, with 21 percent more townhouses listed for sale (167 as compared to 132) than there were in October 2018. All of this activity is indicating a continuing Buyer’s Market across Vancouver Island.

Despite declining sales and a swelling housing inventory the price of homes being sold on Vancouver Island continues to climb. VIREB uses benchmark pricing to track the value of a typical home in each of its individual zones, with these prices showing a continuing upward trend.

During October the board-wide benchmark price of a single family home reached $521,800, a four percent increase from a year ago – but a figure that was down slightly from what was reported in September. The board-wide benchmark price of apartments rose three percent year-over-year in October to $300,200, slightly higher than what was reported in September 2019. In the townhouse category the board-wide benchmark price hit $402,300, an incremental increase over October 2018, but down two percent from September’s benchmark price.

Year-over-year price increases were reported in each of VIREB’s geographic zones such as Nanaimo, where the benchmark price rose less than one percent to close out the month at $559,500. In the Parksville / Qualicum Beach area the benchmark price climbed three percent to $583,900, while in the Cowichan Valley the benchmark price in October climbed an identical three percent to reach $485,300.

In the Comox Valley last month the benchmark price was up five percent from a year ago, reaching $531,400. Further north in Campbell River the price jumped six percent from October 2018 to end the month at $446,300, while in the Alberni Valley the benchmark price soared a full 11 percent from a year ago to reach $336,100.

In a marketplace as volatile and dynamic as Vancouver Island’s it’s more important than ever to have the skills of a real estate professional on your side. Call Peter and Kathy today if you’re interested in buying or selling a property.

Extension was a Key Player in Local History

While today a peaceful and sought-after residential area conveniently located just south of Nanaimo, Extension was in its time a crucial part of the industrial development that helped to open up the Central Vancouver Island region.

Reached via the appropriately named Extension Road, the community is located just past the Cinnabar Valley area, about 15 minutes south of the city’s downtown core. Quiet and green, Extension is located in proximity to the Nanaimo River, a number of extensive walking trails a well as popular parks such as Morden Colliery Park, a four hectare Provincial Park that was created to commemorate the region’s coal mining history.

It is to that quite literally ground-breaking industry that Extension owes its existence. Like Nanaimo itself, coal was the lure that first brought Europeans into the area. James Dunsmuir, son of the legendary coal baron Robert Dunsmuir, was an early industrialist and entrepreneur much like his father. Prior to serving as Premier of British Columbia (from 1900 to 1902) he was actively involved in the coal mining industry on Vancouver Island.

In 1895, following extensive exploration of the area, he opened three large coal mines in what is now the Extension area. These properties were in turn sold to Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., who oversaw the daily operation of the mines. Canadian Collieries were a large industrial concern that operated coal mines and other related facilities all across Vancouver Island including in Comox, Cumberland, the Wellington area and Extension.

There’s something of an air of mystery about Dunsmuir and his timely acquisition of the Extension property. The land in question had been in the possession of a black settler named Louis Stark who had adamantly refused to sell, despite having received advances from more than one interested purchaser. Dunsmuir was able to scoop up the land from Stark’s estate after he had mysteriously died from a fall – a death that to this day remains unexplained.

Regardless of how it was acquired, the industrial development of the Extension area continued for more than three decades before Canadian Collieries shuttered the operations for good in 1932. As an interesting historic side-note the final Canadian Collieries mine on Vancouver Island was Cumberland’s No. 8 Mine which moved its last loads of coal in 1953.

At its height the Extension operations involved a number of functioning mines, operations that employed hundreds of people (more than 900 by some accounts), as well as a colliery that featured an electric railroad that ran underground for more than two miles, connecting the three primary Extension mines. Traditional above ground railroads were used to transport the anthracite to waiting ships that in turn transported this local form of black gold to eager markets around the world.

But the global need for coal diminished as the 20th Century wore on and gradually all mining operations on Vancouver Island ceased by the middle of the century. Interestingly enough one of the Extension area mines (referred to as No. 8) was one of the last. The mine had been opened and then operated by Dunsmuir Collieries until 1928 before being temporarily closed. In 1945 it reopened and operated under a number of different owners before being shut down for good in 1966.

Today Extension is a quiet and appealing satellite community of Nanaimo, but in its early days it was anything but quiet or attractive as it formed the center of the largest industrial development the region has ever known. It is today a reflection of the societal evolution that is a hallmark of much of Vancouver Island.

Housing Prices Rise While Sales Flatten

The number of homes sold across Vancouver Island last month was nearly identical to the number that traded hands a year ago, according to the latest information released by the Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB). During September 345 single family homes were reported sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System. In September 2018 a total of 347 homes were reported sold.

While comparable to last year, the September home sales were actually down 16 percent when compared to August when 413 single family homes were reported sold on the MLS® System. Interestingly the dip in sales was restricted solely to single family homes. The apartment and townhouse categories recorded year-over-year rises in sales, 15 percent and 11 percent respectively for each housing category, indicating an increasing interest in this style of home.

Home purchasers had an expanding pool of properties to choose from last month as well, as the inventory of single family homes rose by 14 percent last month when compared to September 2018. Last month there were 1,466 single family homes on the market compared to the 1,283 that were available for sale at the same time last year.

September also saw an increase in the number of apartments that were on the block, as the supply in this category of homes rose by a whopping 43 percent from a year ago, climbing from 293 to 419 units. The supply of townhouses in comparison actually dipped 18 percent last month from a year ago, going from 171 properties to a total of 140 available for sale.

Despite flat sales and an increasing housing inventory, the price of homes continued to rise across Vancouver Island last month. VIREB uses benchmark pricing to track the value of typical homes in each of its individual zones, with the board-wide benchmark price of a single family home hitting $523,100 in September. This price represents a four percent increase when compared to September 2018, and a two percent rise from August.

The benchmark price of apartments edged up two percent year over year last month to reach $298,900, a price that was slightly lower than what was reported in August. The price of townhouses was up four percent board-wide in September, reaching $411,100, a price that was actually down two percent from August.

Housing price increases were reported in each of VIREB’s individual zones last month. In Nanaimo for example the price of a single family home rose two percent to close the month at $568,200. In the Parksville – Qualicum Beach area the benchmark price of a single family home was up three percent to $591,700, while in the Duncan area the price climbed an identical three percent to $482,100.

In the Comox Valley the price of a single family home climbed five percent to reach $523,900, while further north in Campbell River the price jumped a full 11 percent to end the month at $451,400. In the Alberni Valley the benchmark price of a single family home rose eight percent from September 2018 to reach $327,400.

In a market as volatile and as competitive as the Vancouver Island one has become it’s more important than ever to have a skilled professional on your side. Contact Peter and Kathy today to begin your search for your new home.

Cedar: Country Charms Only Minutes Away

While the City of Nanaimo may be the largest population and service center within the Central Vancouver Island region is certainly isn’t the only one. The area is rich with communities large and small that collectively provide the region with its distinctive charm and character. Located just south of the city, Cedar is one of those very special communities – a part of the city yet separate with its own history and spirit.

Located about eight kilometers south of Nanaimo (or 17 kilometers north east of Ladysmith), Cedar is the perfect blending of rural charms and city conveniences. Home to everything from high end subdivisions and expansive operating farms, to classic churches, century old pubs and a thriving business community, Cedar is in every sense a stand-alone community.

Named after the vicinity’s abundant stands of Western Red Cedar (Thuja plicata), Cedar has been home to local residents since the late 19th Century, with the earliest European property owners moving to the area in the late 1880’s. Cedar officially became a community on April 1, 1888, when the first Post Office opened for business.

Like much of the Central Vancouver Island region coal mining was the engine that initially powered the area’s development. Coal mines operated in Cedar and in the nearby Extension area well into the 20th Century, providing ready employment for its local residents. The four hectare Morden Colliery Historic Provincial Park, home to the last remaining coal tipple on Vancouver Island, is a lasting tribute to this portion of the region’s industrial past and is a popular destination for both locals and visitors.

In addition to coal mining, farming was another of the attractions that drew the first European settlers to the region. Cedar continues to be home to a number of working farms, especially in its lush central area. These operations range from modest hobby farms to full time agricultural ventures. The region is also home two Snuneymuxw First Nation settlements, Nanaimo River Reserve 3 and the Nanaimo River Reserve 4, continuing a legacy of continual habitation that goes back centuries.

But Cedar is more than quaint historic artifacts and rustic rural splendor – it’s also home to a thriving commercial and business sector. The heart of the region’s business community is located along Cedar Road, with the Cedar Village Square shopping complex the primary retail nexus. Grocery stores, banking institutions, restaurants and professional service providers can all be found in the Square’s immediate vicinity. Cedar Road is also lined with everything from public houses and service stations, to lumber yard and houses of worship – all of the ingredients needed for a thriving village to function.

A rustic retreat from the bustle of the city, yet an active and functioning community in its own right, Cedar is popular for locals, visitors or anyone who yearns for something different. Historic, diversified and distinctive, the Cedar region is yet another gem in the crown of the Central Vancouver Island region’s wealth of destinations. Why not take the time and check it out for yourself? You’ll be surprised by all that you will discover.

Housing Inventory & Prices Climb While Sales Decline

While the number of homes currently on the market continues to rise across Vancouver Island, fewer homes were sold last month than during the same period last year. In its latest statistical report the Vancouver Island Real Estate Board (VIREB) stated that 413 single family homes were sold on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) System in August – a drop of 11 percent when compared to last year.

In August 2018 463 single family homes changed hands. Last month’s sales figures were also down nine percent from July’s sales tallies when 453 homes were reported sold on the MLS® System. The dip in sales wasn’t restricted to single family homes as both townhouse and apartment sales also dropped year over year, 28 and 25 percent respectively.

Despite the sales dip the actual number of properties currently on the market continues to rise, fueling the already active buyer’s market. Last month there were 1,485 single family homes listed for sale within VIREB’s coverage area, which extends from the Malahat in the south to the northern tip of Vancouver Island. This is an increase of 11 percent from the same month last year when 1,343 homes were on the market.

While the August townhouse inventory was virtually unchanged from a year ago the number of apartments on the market climbed by a full 23 percent, with 369 homes of this type available on the MLS® System. In August 2018 there were 299 apartments listed for sale.

VIREB reported that housing prices continued to rise all across the Island last month. The Real Estate Board uses benchmark pricing to track the value of typical homes in each of its individual zones, with the board-wide benchmark price of single family homes climbing three percent from a year ago to hit $515,400. Board-wide apartment prices also rose three percent to reach $302,800, while townhouse prices climbed five percent year over year to hit $417,300.

Price increases were reported in each of VIREB’s separate zones during August. In Nanaimo for example the benchmark price edged up slightly to close the month at $560,200. In the nearby Parksville / Qualicum Beach area the benchmark price rose three percent from last year to reach $590,000.

Further north in the Comox Valley, the benchmark price rose by two percent from August 2018 to reach $518,200, while in Campbell River the benchmark price jumped a full 10 percent to end August at $445,100. In the Cowichan Valley the benchmark price climbed four percent to $474,400 while in the Alberni Valley home prices rose five percent from last year to hit $318,200.

With the exception of last month, each month of 2019 has reported a decrease in actual sales activity when compared to last year, despite rising prices and an increasing housing inventory. This is a trend that is expected to continue and one that has created a very dynamic real estate marketplace. Now more than ever both buyers and sellers need the aid of real estate sales professionals when entering the market. Call Peter and Kathy today to begin your real estate journey.